Bootstrap

The Bootstrap Blog

News and announcements for all things Bootstrap, including new releases and Bootstrap Themes.

Help test Bootstrap 2.0.3

Our next release, 2.0.3, is almost ready to rock, but we need your help to get the finish line in the best shape possible. Similar to what we did for the big 2.0 launch, we’re asking for the community’s help in testing out the release’s work-in-progress branch. We have a ton of bug fixes—another 80 or so since 2.0.2—and want to have the highest quality release we can.

Why?

Good question. 2.0.2 introduced some bad bugs in component behavior, publicized outdated documentation, and introduced some ugly regressions. That sucks, and when those things happen, we get held up tracking them down because we missed something in our haste to get a release out the door. We want to focus all our efforts on the 2.1 release after 2.0.3, and to do that we need to get as bug free as we can with this one.

We’ll leave 2.0.3-wip open for widespread testing all this week (April 16-20) and then push a release while Jacob and I are in London on April 24. That should give folks, including us, enough time to test the waters and report any back on any issues.

How?

Just like last time, we’re pushing out a release candidate of the 2.0.3 code and docs. Here’s how you can help us out:

  • Head to GitHub and checkout the 2.0.3-wip branch.
  • Don’t want to check out any code? [We’re hosting the latest version of the docs here (http://203rc1.getbootstrap.com) so you can easily load it up on devices and such for testing.
  • Load up the new docs in your favorite, or your least favorite, browser or device and start testing.
  • When you find a bug or have feedback, open a new issue on GitHub. Please include as much context and information as possible. If it’s a visual bug, please include a screenshot. If it pertains to JavaScript, consider including a jsfiddle or jsbin.
  • If it’s a code fix you can make yourself, go ahead and submit a pull request against 2.0.3-wip. Be sure to read the Contributing to Bootstrap wiki page first though for a bit of insight into our code practices. (Unsure how to submit a pull request? Learn more here.)

We’re only human, and we’re bound to make a few mistakes in our code as Bootstrap continues to grow. Thanks in advance for all your help and support—it’s appreciated more than you know.

Bootstrap's first intercontinental release

As you may have heard, Jacob and I are heading to London in a week to talk Bootstrap—and we’re pretty stoked about it! The event is already sold out, but we’ll be there for a few days to be sure to chat and hang with folks in the area.

As part of our visit and talk, we’ll be releasing Bootstrap 2.0.3 on April 24 from London, our first intercontinental release. It’s been a long time coming, and we know lots of you have been anxiously awaiting its arrival, but we want to do this release the best we can. In addition to the release itself, the rest of our talk will focus on the future of Bootstrap. We’re not exactly sure what that will be yet, but the 2.1 milestone on GitHub might give away some of it.

Stay tuned for more info and feel free to hit us up on Twitter for questions, opportunities to meet up, and more.

25,000

Earlier today Bootstrap passed 25,000 watchers on GitHub. For the last few months it has been the most watched project and continues to grow at an alarming rate. In fact, I recall writing about 8,700 watchers back in October. Jacob and I are still both in awe of how this former internal pet project has grown into one of the most popular front-end frameworks on the Web.

We’ve still got a lot ahead of us for features, refinement, and more, but we wanted to take a moment once again to thank the community for making Bootstrap the success that it is today.

Thank you. Really, thank you.

And a special thanks to the 119 contributors (not including Jacob or myself) who have committed code to Bootstrap. Without you guys, a lot of this wouldn’t be possible.

Here’s to the next 25,000!

<3,

@mdo and @fat

What up, nerds?

Welcome one and all to the new, official Twitter Bootstrap blog. From now on, Jacob and I will be posting info on new releases, documentation changes, great examples of folks using Bootstrap, and more. Stay tuned for our first post on the next two updates for the project.


Coming up in Bootstrap

We’ve been mum on the next few releases for Bootstrap the last couple weeks, and with good reason: both Jacob and I have been super busy at work and we’re uncertain of what features to add next. That said, we know we have some bugs and docs fixes to make and know we can slip in a few small features if time allows. I’ve updated the roadmap to reflect the last two releases and a general outline for the next two.

But, what’s next?

2.0.3

To start, we’ll take a good hard look at the docs and current components to get a strong base and iron out additional bugs we introduced in 2.0.2. This release will not include any new features at all. Key bugs to fix include the static navbar regression and tabbed content alignment, but you can see a more thorough list on the 2.0.3 milestone.

2.1.0

After 2.0.3, we have a small feature and (as required) bugfix release to push out. So far, the only features we’re planning on adding include an official addition of the subnav, Growl-style notifications, and an OOCSS-style media component. The first two are some of oldest feature requests, and honestly are fairly easy to add and document compared to some of the other requests.

We haven’t slated anything else because of other time commitments, but we’re open to hearing your feedback if you have top requests. Feel free to weigh in on Twitter or on GitHub.

Timing

We don’t have specific dates in mind, but we know we want 2.0.3 out by the end of the month to address those key bugs. 2.1 will follow, but not for at least a month or two after 2.0.3.